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20130103
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama cuts short his vacation to head back to washington, while harry reid says the country is headed toward the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on efforts to avert the looming deadline from todd zwillich of public radio international. >> brown: then, geo-politics and children: russia moves to end adoptions by american parents. >> warner: what austerity measures look like at street level: we have a report from athens. >> by the end of 2013 greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: congress stepped back from the brink of financial turmoil, at least for now, after the house passed a tax plan late last night and sent it to president obama. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at how the vote came about and sort through some of the political consequences as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home c
>> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: while much of the country kicked off the new year by going back to work today, washington said its goodbyes to the 112th congress, after a late night of final suspense on the fiscal cliff legislation. it gave the president much of what he wanted on taxes, and left republicans sharply divided. for president obama, the end-- for now-- of the washington budget drama, meant returning to hawaii today to resume his h
chris van hollen of maryland. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown has an update on some of the areas hit hardest by superstorm sandy, where recovery continues at a slow pace. >> suarez: badly damaged by sandy in new jersey, of the community's 520 homes 60 were washed away and 139 remain uninhabitable. still without electricity, gas, sewers or water. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with new members of the 113th congress. tonight the senator-elect from nebraska, republican deb fischer. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... but that was after the measure ran into initial republican resistance with demands for more spending cuts. congress began the new year having missed its deadline to keep tax cuts from rising back to 1990's levels
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama and congressional leaders met face to face for the first time in weeks, in a last-ditch effort to avert the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the chances for a breakthrough-- just four days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's
mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arr
, chicago bears, cleveland browns, kansas city chiefs, philadelphia eagles, and san diego chargers all fired their coaches a day after the regular season ended. five teams also axed their general managers. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: next, secretary of state hillary clinton was hospitalized yesterday after doctors discovered she had a blood clot. few details of her condition were initially released, but late today her doctors said the clot was located in a vein between her skull and brain. they stressed she did not suffer a stroke and is making excellent progress. dr. gholam motamedi, a neurologist at medstar georgetown university hospital, is here to walk us through the known risks and treatments for blood clots. i guess, doctor to start at the very beginning, what is a blood clot. >> blood normally has a tendency to coagulate or clot. if you take the blood out of the system, out of the circulatory system t will clot. if you are, let's say, laying down in a hospital, typically in a hospitalization, without movement, blood has a tendency to form cl
. sólo que a veces no queda nadie para contar la historia. en 1945 un joven marino llamado ed brown sobrevivió a uno de los hundimientos de la segunda guerra mundial. esos tiburones que los rescatistas de ed vieron probablemente eran tiburones oceánicos de punta blanca, un depredador de mar abierto perfectamente adaptado para encontrar y matar a su presa en grandes áreas del océano. en julio de 1945 el crucero uss indianápolis había transportado la primera bomba atómica al atolón de tinian, cuando de regreso a casa recibió un torpedo japonés en 12 minutos cerca de 900 sobrevivientes se vieron flotando en el océano pacífico. (hombre) comenzamos a notar que en la periferia del grupo había muchos tiburones nadando a nuestro alrededor. yo la comparo con... una película de john wayne donde los vagones estaban en una posición y los indios los rodeaban por afuera. eso es lo que los tiburones me recuerdan. a veces mi amigo dallas mccoy solía decirme que vio a algunos de nuestros compañeros alejarse del grupo. se hundían repentinamente y nunca más volvió a verlos. (ian na
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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